Child Neophobia: Why Do Children Fear Some Food?

Child Neophobia: Why Do Children Fear Some Food? Food neophobia is defined as avoidance and reluctance to try new foods. It has been scientifically characterized as a beneficial evolutionary mechanism of survival that helps children avoid ingesting harmful or toxic substances when they begin to become independent from their parents.

Research has shown that the onset of this behavior may occur during weaning, usually with a sharp increase in the age of 2 to 6 years and as the child grows older it decreases. Although limited, evidence from research shows that children with neophobic behavior consume less fruits and vegetables, less protein foods, such as fish and meat, and more fats in our time.

Am I a child neophobia?

The key to effectively tackling a child’s refusal to try new foods (usually fruits and vegetables) is repetition. When a food is regularly served (whether or not it is eaten at all), it gradually becomes familiar with it, at least in appearance and odor, until it ceases to be “new.” • Several studies have shown that when in children given a variety of foods from an early age, the likelihood of developing neophobic behavior is reduced. It has also been found that children tend to try new foods more easily when served in small quantities.

In fact, it often helps that these new foods are presented as accompanying foods that the child is already familiar with. The child’s repeated exposure to the new food, in combination with small rewards, seems to work best. An excellent tactic that reduces the child’s unwillingness to try new foods is the example of the older ones. When he often watches his parents or older siblings eat fruit and vegetables with ease, he becomes more familiar and more willing to try them.

Sea also, Stop Feeding Your Children Hot Dogs/sausage

After all, mimicry is a key learning mechanism at an early age. The exact opposite effects are pressure and coercion, which usually cause reactions and aggravate a child’s phobia. Other tactics that seem to help are the creativity and imagination in serving food, the pleasant, tranquil and safe environment, and most importantly the taking of meals with the whole family (less and less common!). An excellent tactic that reduces the child’s unwillingness to try new foods is the example of the older ones. When he often watches his parents or older siblings eat fruit and vegetables with ease, he becomes more familiar and more willing to try them.

Child Neophobia: Why Do Children Fear Some Food?

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