New blood test to detect early lung cancer

New blood test to detect early lung cancer
The ability to detect early-stage patients with an affordable blood test or saliva test could save thousands of lives per year, worldwide. New Blood test can detect lung cancer at the earlier stage.

Non-small cell lung cancer is often lethal because it is diagnosed in most cases only when it is at an advanced stage that cannot be surgically treated. To improve the clinical outcome of this type of cancer, the University of California’s Los Angeles team is developing a blood test that promises to detect non-small cell lung cancer in its early stages.

Blood test can detect lung cancer at the earlier stage

According to an article in the journal The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, the test is based on a new technology, EFIRM, that is, electric field-induced secretion and measurement, which is so highly sensitive and targeted at detecting two epidermal receptor mutations. EGFR-associated blood cancer factor in patients with non-small cell lung cancer, with early-stage disease. This platform is relatively inexpensive and capable of high performance testing.

It is worth noting that despite advances in chemotherapy, the five-year survival of patients with non-surgically excluded non-small cell lung cancer is less than 10%. Its ability to be diagnosed in stages I and II, when surgical removal and healing are possible, can dramatically reduce mortality worldwide.
 

“The revolutionary EFIRM technology is the most exciting development in non-invasive liquid biopsy in recent years. The ability to detect early-stage patients with an affordable blood test or saliva test could save thousands of lives annually, worldwide, “explains Charles M. Strom, director of the Head of Oncology Research Center, Stomachi Stoma. Indeed, according to Dr. Strom, EFIRM technology can also be applied to monitor treatment progress and detect relapses in patients who have already been diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer.

Researchers who previously successfully measured two EGFR mutations, p.L858R and Exon 19del, in blood samples from patients with non-small-cell lung cancer thanks to EFIRM, wanted to see if the mutations could be detected. samples of patients with early stage disease.


They therefore collected plasma samples from 248 patients with radiographically defined pulmonary nodules. Of these, 44 were diagnosed with stage I or II non-small cell lung cancer (23 with proven, biopsy, benign pulmonary nodules, and 21 with stage I or II adenocarcinoma). EFIRM technology has been able to detect the p.L858R mutation in 11 of the 12 samples and the Exon 19del in seven of the nine, representing over 90% detection sensitivity and 80% specificity.
 

“At present, the clinical sensitivity of EFIRM to the detection of patients with non-small cell lung cancer is limited by the proportion of tumors containing either one or both mutations, accounting for 27% of tumors of this type of cancer. But we are developing a panel of ten mutations that contain mutations that are expressed in 50% of all lung malignancies, “explains researcher Gu-Chu Shu, of the Department of Pathology at Taiwan’s Cheng Kung National University Hospital.
 
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